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[A poster for a special marathon showing of the three films comprising the Cornetto Trilogy hosted by AMC Theaters in August 2013. The poster features the text “Edgar Wright’s The Cornetto Trilogy” above the three Cornetto flavors: to the left, the Strawberry Cornetto is shown above the cast from “Shaun of the Dead”; to the right, the Original Cornetto sits above the characters and logo of “Hot Fuzz”; in the center, the Mint Chocolate Chip-flavored treat hovers behind the characters of “The World’s End”. The tagline of the showing, “three flavourful movies in one night,” is printed at the bottom.]
Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and The World’s End: although there are no recurring characters or plot elements, these three films are all directed by Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost are said to comprise the Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy. Each film is a genre comedy of a different style; Shaun of the Dead is a zombie romantic comedy, Hot Fuzz is a buddy-cop movie, and The World’s End is a science-fiction movie about an alien invasion.

Although each movie in the Cornetto Trilogy is very different plot-wise, there are some thematic elements that span all movies, like the bromance between the characters played by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Especially in Hot Fuzz does the line between bromance and romance become blurred, as was even acknowledged by the movie’s creators and actors in a memorable Twitter session in 2009 where many recommendations of slash fiction and some steamy prompts were shared by the movie’s cast and crew.

 Celebrate the Cornetto Trilogy fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 and expanding the Fanlore page by adding fan resources and fandom stories. Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection!  

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[A poster for a special marathon showing of the three films comprising the Cornetto Trilogy hosted by AMC Theaters in August 2013. The poster features the text “Edgar Wright’s The Cornetto Trilogy” above the three Cornetto flavors: to the left, the Strawberry Cornetto is shown above the cast from “Shaun of the Dead”; to the right, the Original Cornetto sits above the characters and logo of “Hot Fuzz”; in the center, the Mint Chocolate Chip-flavored treat hovers behind the characters of “The World’s End”. The tagline of the showing, “three flavourful movies in one night,” is printed at the bottom.]


Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and The World’s End: although there are no recurring characters or plot elements, these three films are all directed by Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost are said to comprise the Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy. Each film is a genre comedy of a different style; Shaun of the Dead is a zombie romantic comedy, Hot Fuzz is a buddy-cop movie, and The World’s End is a science-fiction movie about an alien invasion.

Although each movie in the Cornetto Trilogy is very different plot-wise, there are some thematic elements that span all movies, like the bromance between the characters played by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Especially in Hot Fuzz does the line between bromance and romance become blurred, as was even acknowledged by the movie’s creators and actors in a memorable Twitter session in 2009 where many recommendations of slash fiction and some steamy prompts were shared by the movie’s cast and crew.

Celebrate the Cornetto Trilogy fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 and expanding the Fanlore page by adding fan resources and fandom stories. Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection!


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess game. Link stands at an angle in the foreground, dressed in green with his sword strapped to his back.  A shadowed figure can be seen over his shoulder where the image fades to black.]
In 1986 The Legend of Zelda was released in Japan for the Famicon Disk System.  It was released in the United States and Europe in 1987 and later converted for the Nintendo Entertainment System.  Today, the Legend of Zelda series is one of Nintendo’s longest-running and most popular video game series.  The games typically center on three characters: the protagonist, Link, Princess Zelda, and the evil Ganondorf.  Despite differences in story or setting, each game in the series is made to feel similar through the use of secondary characters, places or items presented in other games. The mystical artifact known as the Triforce also features heavily in the series, as an item that Link is often tasked to protect, or retrieve.

In the nearly thirty years since The Legend of Zelda was created by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka for Nintendo, the series has become home to 17 official games, several spin-off games, an American animated series, and several manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo. The series received it’s biggest bump in popularity in 1998 with the release of Ocarina of Time. The first websites for the fandom went up during this time, when the internet as we know it was still new.  Many of those sites are still online for fans to enjoy.

Help celebrate The Lengend of Zelda fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess game. Link stands at an angle in the foreground, dressed in green with his sword strapped to his back. A shadowed figure can be seen over his shoulder where the image fades to black.]


In 1986 The Legend of Zelda was released in Japan for the Famicon Disk System. It was released in the United States and Europe in 1987 and later converted for the Nintendo Entertainment System. Today, the Legend of Zelda series is one of Nintendo’s longest-running and most popular video game series. The games typically center on three characters: the protagonist, Link, Princess Zelda, and the evil Ganondorf. Despite differences in story or setting, each game in the series is made to feel similar through the use of secondary characters, places or items presented in other games. The mystical artifact known as the Triforce also features heavily in the series, as an item that Link is often tasked to protect, or retrieve.

In the nearly thirty years since The Legend of Zelda was created by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka for Nintendo, the series has become home to 17 official games, several spin-off games, an American animated series, and several manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo. The series received it’s biggest bump in popularity in 1998 with the release of Ocarina of Time. The first websites for the fandom went up during this time, when the internet as we know it was still new. Many of those sites are still online for fans to enjoy.

Help celebrate The Lengend of Zelda fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Photoset of images from the German TV series “Tatort”, specifically the Münster team: crime investigation duo Frank Thiel (Axel Prahl) & Karl-Friedrich Boerne (Jan Josef Liefers) and their colleagues.]


Tatort (“Crime Scene”) is a long-running crime show, focusing on different teams in various German, Swiss, and Austrian cities. The regional TV channels which together form the ARD network (as well as Swiss channel SF and Austrian Channel ORF) produce its own run of episodes, starring its own police inspector or team of inspectors. The first episode was broadcast in 1970, and some inspectors, like Kommissar Schimanski have reached some fame outside German borders. The opening sequence for the series has remained the same throughout the decades.

A small fandom has formed around the Tatort series set in Münster, starring Axel Prahl als Hauptkommissar Frank Thiel and Jan Josef Liefers as Rechtsmediziner (forensic doctor) Professor Karl-Friedrich Boerne. In true buddy cop tradition, the fannish output focuses on the relationship between the main protagonists, who accidentally become neighbors as well as colleagues. (Hijinx ensue!)

Help us celebrate this and other Tatort teams by posting your fic or fanart on AO3, and expand the list of resources on the Fanlore page! For recs, add your bookmarks to our April Showers collection!


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

We need volunteers for AO3’s Abuse team, as well as for our Volunteers & Recruiting Committee, and our Legal Advocacy project! http://bit.ly/RiFYRF

We need volunteers for AO3’s Abuse team, as well as for our Volunteers & Recruiting Committee, and our Legal Advocacy project! http://bit.ly/RiFYRF

[The cover of Young Avengers (2013) #13, featuring the title’s logo in the center above the assembled cast: (clockwise from top) Hulkling, Wiccan, Marvel Boy, Miss America, Hawkeye, and Prodigy. A red Marvel banner at the bottom gives the issue’s title at the left and the list of this issue’s creators at the right.]
Young Avengers is an American comic book published by Marvel. The first run, spearheaded by Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung, began in 2005 and ran until 2012. In 2013, Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie brought the series back, adding some new characters to the group’s roster. 

As both Young Avengers series focus on the adventures of some of the teenage heroes of the Marvel universe, several of the stories include such common young adult themes as destiny, young love, and leaving home, but with a unique backdrop of time travel, reality-warping powers, and alien invasions.

Both iterations also feature a diverse cast of characters, but the characters of Wiccan (Billy Kaplan) and Hulkling (Teddy Altman) may be the most famous. As young superheroes in a stable homosexual relationship, these Young Avengers were quickly recognized as role models not just for their heroic deeds in fighting evil, but in being a positive influence for homosexual and/or questioning youth. In fact, both launches of the series have won GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) Media Awards for Outstanding Comic Books: first in 2008 and again in 2014.

Celebrate the Young Avengers by posting creations new and old on AO3, and expand the list of resources and share fandom stories on the Fanlore page! Got a favorite Young Avengers creation to share? Add Young Avengers fan fiction and fan art recommendations to our April Showers collection!

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[The cover of Young Avengers (2013) #13, featuring the title’s logo in the center above the assembled cast: (clockwise from top) Hulkling, Wiccan, Marvel Boy, Miss America, Hawkeye, and Prodigy. A red Marvel banner at the bottom gives the issue’s title at the left and the list of this issue’s creators at the right.]


Young Avengers is an American comic book published by Marvel. The first run, spearheaded by Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung, began in 2005 and ran until 2012. In 2013, Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie brought the series back, adding some new characters to the group’s roster.

As both Young Avengers series focus on the adventures of some of the teenage heroes of the Marvel universe, several of the stories include such common young adult themes as destiny, young love, and leaving home, but with a unique backdrop of time travel, reality-warping powers, and alien invasions.

Both iterations also feature a diverse cast of characters, but the characters of Wiccan (Billy Kaplan) and Hulkling (Teddy Altman) may be the most famous. As young superheroes in a stable homosexual relationship, these Young Avengers were quickly recognized as role models not just for their heroic deeds in fighting evil, but in being a positive influence for homosexual and/or questioning youth. In fact, both launches of the series have won GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) Media Awards for Outstanding Comic Books: first in 2008 and again in 2014.

Celebrate the Young Avengers by posting creations new and old on AO3, and expand the list of resources and share fandom stories on the Fanlore page! Got a favorite Young Avengers creation to share? Add Young Avengers fan fiction and fan art recommendations to our April Showers collection!


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Poster for the premiere of Hannibal showing Dr. Hannibal Lecter in a dark blue suit wiping his mouth with a tan napkin.]
Developed by Bryan Fuller, Hannibal is a psychological thriller-horror television show based on characters from the novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris.  The story centers on the relationship between Will Graham, a special investigator for the FBI, and Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a forensic psychiatrist, serial killer and fancy cannibal.  As Will helps the FBI investigate the serial killer known as the Chesapeake Ripper, his mental health declines under the devious care of Dr. Lecter.

Hannibal is notable for its fandom, which assembled seemingly from nowhere after just a few episodes of its first season in 2013.  Calling themselves fannibals, the Hannibal fandom has embraced hilarious and cheerful tags, memes and tropes to celebrate the show despite its serious and grim subject matter.  Show creator, Bryan Fuller, as well as the cast and crew of the show have openly embraced the fandom, including an offical Tumblr for the show that engages the fandom regularly.  Before the premiere of the second season in February of 2014, those involved with the show also engaged the fandom in a rewatch of the entire first season, calling the event the #13HourDevour.

This month, you can celebrate the Hannibal fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Poster for the premiere of Hannibal showing Dr. Hannibal Lecter in a dark blue suit wiping his mouth with a tan napkin.]


Developed by Bryan Fuller, Hannibal is a psychological thriller-horror television show based on characters from the novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris. The story centers on the relationship between Will Graham, a special investigator for the FBI, and Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a forensic psychiatrist, serial killer and fancy cannibal. As Will helps the FBI investigate the serial killer known as the Chesapeake Ripper, his mental health declines under the devious care of Dr. Lecter.

Hannibal is notable for its fandom, which assembled seemingly from nowhere after just a few episodes of its first season in 2013. Calling themselves fannibals, the Hannibal fandom has embraced hilarious and cheerful tags, memes and tropes to celebrate the show despite its serious and grim subject matter. Show creator, Bryan Fuller, as well as the cast and crew of the show have openly embraced the fandom, including an offical Tumblr for the show that engages the fandom regularly. Before the premiere of the second season in February of 2014, those involved with the show also engaged the fandom in a rewatch of the entire first season, calling the event the #13HourDevour.

This month, you can celebrate the Hannibal fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Image of Discworld, created by Josh Kirby. Great A’Tuin, the Giant Star Turtle, is floating through space, carrying four massive elephants on its massive back, who are in turn holding up the Discworld. Water from the oceans is sloshing over the rim into space, as you’d expect from water covering a disc-shaped mass of land.]
The Discworld series is a collection of fantasy novels by Terry Pratchett, set in a fictional world which resembles our own in very many ways, except with more magic. There are currently 40 Discworld novels, and if that’s a little overwhelming for new fans, there’s a helpful Reading Order Guide which gathers up all books into a manageable number of main arcs and themes.

Filled with witches and politics and Death and higher education and a wide array of guilds (the Assassins’ Guild being considerably less terrifying than the Fools’ Guild), the Discworld is your fannish oyster. And while the series may or may not have started out as a lighthearted parody of the fantasy genre, “Terry Pratchett hasn’t been an escapist writer for quite some time. He’ll amuse you, sure; but he won’t tell you that things are great just the way they are, or that they’re hopeless and there’s nothing you can do. He’ll tell you that you — yes, you — should make them better. And then he’ll do something even more radical. He’ll make you think you can.” (source)

Join us in celebrating the Discworld fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 or by contributing information and fannish links to its Fanlore page! Remember you can also contribute by sharing your Discworld recs in our April Showers collection.
(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Image of Discworld, created by Josh Kirby. Great A’Tuin, the Giant Star Turtle, is floating through space, carrying four massive elephants on its massive back, who are in turn holding up the Discworld. Water from the oceans is sloshing over the rim into space, as you’d expect from water covering a disc-shaped mass of land.]


The Discworld series is a collection of fantasy novels by Terry Pratchett, set in a fictional world which resembles our own in very many ways, except with more magic. There are currently 40 Discworld novels, and if that’s a little overwhelming for new fans, there’s a helpful Reading Order Guide which gathers up all books into a manageable number of main arcs and themes.

Filled with witches and politics and Death and higher education and a wide array of guilds (the Assassins’ Guild being considerably less terrifying than the Fools’ Guild), the Discworld is your fannish oyster. And while the series may or may not have started out as a lighthearted parody of the fantasy genre, “Terry Pratchett hasn’t been an escapist writer for quite some time. He’ll amuse you, sure; but he won’t tell you that things are great just the way they are, or that they’re hopeless and there’s nothing you can do. He’ll tell you that you — yes, you — should make them better. And then he’ll do something even more radical. He’ll make you think you can.” (source)

Join us in celebrating the Discworld fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 or by contributing information and fannish links to its Fanlore page! Remember you can also contribute by sharing your Discworld recs in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Image of Eugène Delacroix’s painting ‘La Liberté guidant le peuple’, commemorating the July 1830 Revolution but often associated with the French Revolution of 1789, taken from Wikipedia. A female representation of liberty, bare-breasted and holding a bayonet, leads forth a mob brandishing the tricolour French Revolutionary flag.]
From 1789-1799, France was the scene of a profound social and political upheaval known as the French Revolution. Founded on Enlightenment principles, the Revolution challenged absolute monarchy and feudalism and sought to define a new order for France. Over its course, it led to the Declaration of the Right of Man and of the Citizen, the storming of the Bastille fortress, the execution of King Louis XVI, the proclamation of the first French Republic, and tens of thousands of deaths in the Reign of Terror.

French Revolution RPF (Real Person Fic) is a small but passionate fandom that likes to talk of political ideals and revolutionaries in love. In particular, the fandom likes to debate the highly-contested nature of the Revolution’s polarizing participants, seeking to do justice to their complexity and context.

Most recently, the popularity of the  film adaptation of Les Misérables, which deals with the aftermath of the Revolution despite being set well after its events, has greatly bolstered fannish attention in this fascinating period of history. Contrary to the Les Misérables fandom, however, French Revolution RPF focusses on the lives of the period’s colourful cast of historical figures, from Maximilien Robespierre (1758-1794), to Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), and Marie Antoinette (1755-1793).

Please help us celebrate the French Revolution RPF fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 or by helping to build-up its stub Fanlore page! Remember you can also contribute by sharing your French Revolution RPF recs on our April Showers collection.

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Image of Eugène Delacroix’s painting ‘La Liberté guidant le peuple’, commemorating the July 1830 Revolution but often associated with the French Revolution of 1789, taken from Wikipedia. A female representation of liberty, bare-breasted and holding a bayonet, leads forth a mob brandishing the tricolour French Revolutionary flag.]


From 1789-1799, France was the scene of a profound social and political upheaval known as the French Revolution. Founded on Enlightenment principles, the Revolution challenged absolute monarchy and feudalism and sought to define a new order for France. Over its course, it led to the Declaration of the Right of Man and of the Citizen, the storming of the Bastille fortress, the execution of King Louis XVI, the proclamation of the first French Republic, and tens of thousands of deaths in the Reign of Terror.

French Revolution RPF (Real Person Fic) is a small but passionate fandom that likes to talk of political ideals and revolutionaries in love. In particular, the fandom likes to debate the highly-contested nature of the Revolution’s polarizing participants, seeking to do justice to their complexity and context.

Most recently, the popularity of the film adaptation of Les Misérables, which deals with the aftermath of the Revolution despite being set well after its events, has greatly bolstered fannish attention in this fascinating period of history. Contrary to the Les Misérables fandom, however, French Revolution RPF focusses on the lives of the period’s colourful cast of historical figures, from Maximilien Robespierre (1758-1794), to Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), and Marie Antoinette (1755-1793).

Please help us celebrate the French Revolution RPF fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 or by helping to build-up its stub Fanlore page! Remember you can also contribute by sharing your French Revolution RPF recs on our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

In one of our next code updates, we’re going to be rolling out some changes to the FAQ section of the Archive. Here’s a little information on what improvements the new FAQ will include, and what this change means for you.

Improvements

As one of the main improvements, it will enable easy translation of questions and answers. Our volunteer translators will be able to submit their work to the FAQ and link it to the corresponding English text. The new interface for users will introduce a simple drop-down box for filtering the FAQ by language.

Screenshot 1[Work-in-progress screenshot of the new FAQs, here depicting the list of available topics in Portuguese]

The new FAQ interface will benefit from a cleaner, easier-to-edit structure that makes adding questions to categories more straightforward. Browsing the FAQ will also be a lot easier: we’ll improve our index page, so that you can see at a glance a full list of questions without having to read through the entire page.

Screenshot 2[Work-in-progress screenshot of the new FAQs, here depicting the list of all available questions for one topic in Spanish]

Expected Issues

We had to make significant changes to the existing code to enable these new features. In addition, our AO3 Docs team has been working on a new and improved FAQ structure, as well as updates to the existing sections. New content will be added as work on these updates progresses.

As a result, old links to the FAQ might stop working or will link to an unexpected section of the new FAQ. For example, the link to the Bookmarks FAQ might suddenly lead you to the FAQ about Downloads. Please bear this in mind if you have linked to the FAQ on another site, as these links will likely need updating. FAQ links included previously within AO3’s official communication (for instance on AO3 News or in previous Support replies) will also be affected, although we will do our best to update our own resources.

Finally, there’s a chance that internal links from one section of the FAQ to another will also break temporarily as we wire the new FAQ together. There’s a small possibility that following the code deploy, the FAQ section will be empty as we work on re-adding all existing content.

Looking Forward

We’re excited about these latest updates: we hope that they’ll not only improve our documentation and make it easier for you to find answers to your questions, but will also be a big step forward in beginning to make the Archive accessible in different languages for fans around the world. Many thanks to our teams of translators, documentation volunteers, coders and testers for all of their work on this project! We hope you find these changes helpful, and we look forward to your feedback.

العربيةBahasa IndonesiaDeutschEnglishespañolItalianoNederlandsPolskiportuguêssuomisvenskaTürkçe

[The movie poster for Pacific Rim with a Jaeger crashing through a city street taking up the top two-thirds of the image and the title of the movie and the tag lines “To fight monsters we created monsters” and “Go big or go extinct” at the bottom.]
Pacific Rim is a science fiction movie set in the year 2020 when all of Earth is at war with a race of colossal monsters known as the Kaiju.  When the movie begins, the world has been fighting back against the Kaiju for seven years using giant machines called Jaegers, each of which are piloted by at least two humans linked through a neural connection.  The story centers around the few remaining Jaeger pilots and their last-ditch effort to save the human race.  The heroes must collapse the interdimensional portal the Kaiju are using to travel to Earth before the few remaining Jaegers are overwhelmed and the Earth is destroyed.

The movie, released in 2013, was inspired by monster movies of previous generations and was intended by co-writer and director, Guillermo del Toro, to introduce a new generation of movie-goers to both the kaiju and mecha movie genres.  Pacific Rim is notable for being a summer blockbuster movie featuring a woman of color as a lead character portrayed as equal in force to the male characters.  While the film is American, the story at its core is an international one, with the Jaegers and their pilots originating from around the globe.  Not long after the movie’s release last year, fandom held its own tumblr-based convention for the movie, JaegerCon, from August 9th-11th to coincide with K-Day, the day of the first Kaiju attack.

This month, you can celebrate the Pacific Rim fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[The movie poster for Pacific Rim with a Jaeger crashing through a city street taking up the top two-thirds of the image and the title of the movie and the tag lines “To fight monsters we created monsters” and “Go big or go extinct” at the bottom.]


Pacific Rim is a science fiction movie set in the year 2020 when all of Earth is at war with a race of colossal monsters known as the Kaiju. When the movie begins, the world has been fighting back against the Kaiju for seven years using giant machines called Jaegers, each of which are piloted by at least two humans linked through a neural connection. The story centers around the few remaining Jaeger pilots and their last-ditch effort to save the human race. The heroes must collapse the interdimensional portal the Kaiju are using to travel to Earth before the few remaining Jaegers are overwhelmed and the Earth is destroyed.

The movie, released in 2013, was inspired by monster movies of previous generations and was intended by co-writer and director, Guillermo del Toro, to introduce a new generation of movie-goers to both the kaiju and mecha movie genres. Pacific Rim is notable for being a summer blockbuster movie featuring a woman of color as a lead character portrayed as equal in force to the male characters. While the film is American, the story at its core is an international one, with the Jaegers and their pilots originating from around the globe. Not long after the movie’s release last year, fandom held its own tumblr-based convention for the movie, JaegerCon, from August 9th-11th to coincide with K-Day, the day of the first Kaiju attack.

This month, you can celebrate the Pacific Rim fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)