AO3 News
transformativeworks:

[Red ballpoint pen with OTW logo in white]
Who doesn’t love swag? The OTW will be opening a merchandise store just for you - tell us what we should stock! http://bit.ly/QF8bRQ

transformativeworks:

[Red ballpoint pen with OTW logo in white]

Who doesn’t love swag? The OTW will be opening a merchandise store just for you - tell us what we should stock! http://bit.ly/QF8bRQ

[Image of the band’s five members, couching and looking up towards the camera. They wear a colourful array of clothing and pull various playful expressions. Below them, large red text reads ‘Arashi’. Scan from EastAsiaLicious]
Arashi (嵐), meaning ‘storm’, is a Japanese idol group which gained prominence in 2007, when their song “Love So Sweet” was used in the opening of the popular j-drama, Hana Yori Dango Returns. Arashi has a musical style encompassing pop, rock, R&B, and hip-hop, and is composed of five members: Satoshi Ohno (大野 智), Sho Sakurai (櫻井翔), Masaki Aiba (相葉 雅紀), Kazunari Ninomiya (二宮 和也), and Jun Matsumoto (松本 潤).

Both individual band members and Arashi as a whole have appeared in a number of Japanese TV series, variety shows, and movies. As such, the Arashi fandom intersects heavily with the Japanese Actor RPF fandom, which likely contributes to the fandom’s impressive activity levels. The Arashi fandom also boasts huge variety, with content ranging from .gifs and graphics to fanvideos, scans, news-sharing and fanfiction.

Join us in celebrating the Arashi fandom this month by posting your fanworks at AO3, and sharing your experience of the fandom on its Fanlore page! Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Image of the band’s five members, couching and looking up towards the camera. They wear a colourful array of clothing and pull various playful expressions. Below them, large red text reads ‘Arashi’. Scan from EastAsiaLicious]


Arashi (嵐), meaning ‘storm’, is a Japanese idol group which gained prominence in 2007, when their song “Love So Sweet” was used in the opening of the popular j-drama, Hana Yori Dango Returns. Arashi has a musical style encompassing pop, rock, R&B, and hip-hop, and is composed of five members: Satoshi Ohno (大野 智), Sho Sakurai (櫻井翔), Masaki Aiba (相葉 雅紀), Kazunari Ninomiya (二宮 和也), and Jun Matsumoto (松本 潤).

Both individual band members and Arashi as a whole have appeared in a number of Japanese TV series, variety shows, and movies. As such, the Arashi fandom intersects heavily with the Japanese Actor RPF fandom, which likely contributes to the fandom’s impressive activity levels. The Arashi fandom also boasts huge variety, with content ranging from .gifs and graphics to fanvideos, scans, news-sharing and fanfiction.

Join us in celebrating the Arashi fandom this month by posting your fanworks at AO3, and sharing your experience of the fandom on its Fanlore page! Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Elder Scrolls Online game. A circle in the middle is formed by the heads of three creatures joined one to another: a lion, a dragon and an eagle, symbols of the three game factions.]
The Elder Scrolls video game series began in 1994 with The Elder Scrolls: Arena a PC game.  Created by Bethesda, this series takes place on the fictional continent of Tamriel.  Many of the games in the series are role-playing action-adventure games in a fantasy setting.  Known for their rich settings and open-form gameplay, there are six major games in the series, the most recent of which is The Elder Scrolls Online.

The high fantasy setting unites the Elder Scrolls series, using the unique world, its creatures and cultures to give the series cohesion.  The scrolls themselves, which give the series its name, frame the stories but play a limited role. Given the role-playing aspect of the games, players create their own characters for each game in order to explore the expansive settings, interact with the stories and the characters.  The original characters created by fans give the fandom its life as they interact with each other and the unique non-player characters in each game.  

Help celebrate The Elder Scrolls fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Elder Scrolls Online game. A circle in the middle is formed by the heads of three creatures joined one to another: a lion, a dragon and an eagle, symbols of the three game factions.]


The Elder Scrolls video game series began in 1994 with The Elder Scrolls: Arena a PC game. Created by Bethesda, this series takes place on the fictional continent of Tamriel. Many of the games in the series are role-playing action-adventure games in a fantasy setting. Known for their rich settings and open-form gameplay, there are six major games in the series, the most recent of which is The Elder Scrolls Online.

The high fantasy setting unites the Elder Scrolls series, using the unique world, its creatures and cultures to give the series cohesion. The scrolls themselves, which give the series its name, frame the stories but play a limited role. Given the role-playing aspect of the games, players create their own characters for each game in order to explore the expansive settings, interact with the stories and the characters. The original characters created by fans give the fandom its life as they interact with each other and the unique non-player characters in each game.

Help celebrate The Elder Scrolls fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

["due South" title card (compass needle pointing south), and two promotion images depicting Benton Fraser (Paul Gross) with Ray Vecchio (David Marciano) and Benton Fraser with Ray Kowalski (Callum Keith Rennie). Not pictured: Diefenbaker.]


Canadian crime series due South aired from 1994 to 1999, with 68 episodes spread over four seasons. It combines a fish-out-of-water premise with the emotional beats of a strong friendship across cultural and personalitiy divides: Benton Fraser, member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, first came to Chicago on the trail of the killers of his father and, for reasons which don’t need exploring at this juncture, he remained, attached as liaison to the Canadian consulate. (He would go on to give this speech several times over the course of the show.) He partners up with Ray Vecchio, a Chicago cop, for various crime-solving and -fighting activities.

In the beginning of season 3, Vecchio has to go undercover and is replaced with a new Ray. (Cue the shipping wars!)

While activity has slowed down (and moved off the old Yahoo mailing lists), due South fandom (and its umbrella fandom, 6 Degrees of Canada) has remained alive and kicking, even fifteen years after the season finale. The fact that Ray and Fraser literally rode off into the sunset together might or might not have contributed to the show’s popularity.

This month help us celebrate due South fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Join the fun by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

transformativeworks:

AO3 has some proposed changes to its Terms of Service & FAQ and today opens a 2 week comment period. Find out why they’re needed: http://bit.ly/1rfDkXq

transformativeworks:

AO3 has some proposed changes to its Terms of Service & FAQ and today opens a 2 week comment period. Find out why they’re needed: http://bit.ly/1rfDkXq

sarking:

[Description: Screen captures illustrating the following steps for using the Archive of Our Own’s Tumblr share feature.]

Hey, did you know there’s an easy way to share AO3 works and bookmarks on Tumblr?

Copying and pasting the URL into a link post is easy, sure, but AO3 has a built-in way to share not just the link, but all of the important work information (e.g. the rating and the relationships), and it only takes a few clicks.

  1. Locate and select the Share link on the work you want to share. It’s at the top of the work, with the Bookmark, Download, and other links.
  2. A modal window will open on top of the work. Within it, locate and select the Tumblr link. (If there isn’t a Tumblr link, that means the work’s owner has disabled this option, and you’ll have to settle for sharing the regular way.)
  3. A mini Tumblr post form will open, already filled in with the work URL, title, author, tags, and summary. If you want to post it to your blog right away and without tags, select Create Post.
  4. But if you want to add tags or put the post in your queue, select Advanced instead. You can add a comma-separated list of tags or set other posting options here, and then click Create Post when you’re done.
  5. Admire the beauty of your lovely link post! And check your Dash, you know, as long as you’re here…

There’s also a Tumblr option for sharing bookmarks that will automatically include any notes you’ve added to that bookmark. You can find the Share button for bookmarks on your bookmarks page, right by the options for editing or deleting a particular bookmark (using the regular Share button on top of the work won’t copy your notes).

[The cover of The Sandman: Overture #1, as is evidenced by the title which swoops from the top left of the page. The main character, Dream, stands in a black feathered coat with flames licking the edges, wearing his egg-shaped helmet and lightly touching a large ruby hanging around his neck. Behind him, a planet and space scene is visible while, in the foreground, a field of toothed flowers flick their tongues. The writer and artist’s names, Neil Gaiman and J. H. Williams III, adorn the bottom of the page.]
The Sandman is an American-British comic book series published by DC Comics under their Vertigo imprint. First published in 1989, the series follows the character of Dream, one of the immortal Endless, who rules and controls the world we inhabit when we sleep. After Dream is captured and imprisoned for decades, the dream-world begins to warp and fall apart; upon his release, he works to reinstate his command and fix what had been broken.

In 2013, a prequel series was launched for the first issue’s 25th anniversary. Titled The Sandman: Overture, the new series explains how Dream was weakened enough to be captured at the start of the original series. 

Although published by DC comics, the series rarely featured the publisher’s superheroes, instead focusing on world-building. As such, The Sandman is a common crossover or alternate universe setting for other fandoms wishing to give its characters a unique experience.

Join us in celebrating The Sandman fandom this month by posting your fan creations on AO3, and expanding the fandom page on Fanlore! Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[The cover of The Sandman: Overture #1, as is evidenced by the title which swoops from the top left of the page. The main character, Dream, stands in a black feathered coat with flames licking the edges, wearing his egg-shaped helmet and lightly touching a large ruby hanging around his neck. Behind him, a planet and space scene is visible while, in the foreground, a field of toothed flowers flick their tongues. The writer and artist’s names, Neil Gaiman and J. H. Williams III, adorn the bottom of the page.]


The Sandman is an American-British comic book series published by DC Comics under their Vertigo imprint. First published in 1989, the series follows the character of Dream, one of the immortal Endless, who rules and controls the world we inhabit when we sleep. After Dream is captured and imprisoned for decades, the dream-world begins to warp and fall apart; upon his release, he works to reinstate his command and fix what had been broken.

In 2013, a prequel series was launched for the first issue’s 25th anniversary. Titled The Sandman: Overture, the new series explains how Dream was weakened enough to be captured at the start of the original series.

Although published by DC comics, the series rarely featured the publisher’s superheroes, instead focusing on world-building. As such, The Sandman is a common crossover or alternate universe setting for other fandoms wishing to give its characters a unique experience.

Join us in celebrating The Sandman fandom this month by posting your fan creations on AO3, and expanding the fandom page on Fanlore! Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Penguin Books banner for the 80th anniversary of Nancy Drew in 2010, with an image of Nancy seated in the middle trying to open a large clock. On the side of the image is a close up of Nancy peering through a magnifying glass.]
The first Nancy Drew novel, The Secret of the Old Clock was written in 1928 by Mildred Wirt, under the psuedonym Carolyn Keene, for publisher Edward Stratemeyer’s Stratemeyer Syndicate of ghostwriters.  When the series first premiered, Nancy was a teen girl detective of sixteen, living with her widowed father and their housekeeper in the fictional town of River Heights.  In the years since her debut, some of the details about Nancy’s life have changed with the times, but much about her remains the same.  While Nancy often stumbles upon the mysteries she solves in the novels, she’s written as a sort of sleuthing prodigy, with the brains, looks and means to solve her mysteries efficiently.

The concept of a girl detective, like Nancy Drew (but not originally named such) was designed by the creator of the Hardy Boys novels to capitalize on the female readership of those novels.  In the more than eighty years since her inception, Nancy Drew has far outlived her designs, becoming a female icon of daring and independence.  She’s appeared in movies, board games, video games, and on a host of merchandise bringing her into the hands of fans everywhere.  Fans have long been interested not only in Nancy’s life but also those of the friends she brings on her cases, Bess Martin and George Fayne, her boyfriend Ned Nickerson, as well as fellow teen sleuths like Frank and Joe Hardy.

This month help us celebrate the long-standing Nancy Drew fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[Penguin Books banner for the 80th anniversary of Nancy Drew in 2010, with an image of Nancy seated in the middle trying to open a large clock. On the side of the image is a close up of Nancy peering through a magnifying glass.]


The first Nancy Drew novel, The Secret of the Old Clock was written in 1928 by Mildred Wirt, under the psuedonym Carolyn Keene, for publisher Edward Stratemeyer’s Stratemeyer Syndicate of ghostwriters. When the series first premiered, Nancy was a teen girl detective of sixteen, living with her widowed father and their housekeeper in the fictional town of River Heights. In the years since her debut, some of the details about Nancy’s life have changed with the times, but much about her remains the same. While Nancy often stumbles upon the mysteries she solves in the novels, she’s written as a sort of sleuthing prodigy, with the brains, looks and means to solve her mysteries efficiently.

The concept of a girl detective, like Nancy Drew (but not originally named such) was designed by the creator of the Hardy Boys novels to capitalize on the female readership of those novels. In the more than eighty years since her inception, Nancy Drew has far outlived her designs, becoming a female icon of daring and independence. She’s appeared in movies, board games, video games, and on a host of merchandise bringing her into the hands of fans everywhere. Fans have long been interested not only in Nancy’s life but also those of the friends she brings on her cases, Bess Martin and George Fayne, her boyfriend Ned Nickerson, as well as fellow teen sleuths like Frank and Joe Hardy.

This month help us celebrate the long-standing Nancy Drew fandom by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[A poster for a special marathon showing of the three films comprising the Cornetto Trilogy hosted by AMC Theaters in August 2013. The poster features the text “Edgar Wright’s The Cornetto Trilogy” above the three Cornetto flavors: to the left, the Strawberry Cornetto is shown above the cast from “Shaun of the Dead”; to the right, the Original Cornetto sits above the characters and logo of “Hot Fuzz”; in the center, the Mint Chocolate Chip-flavored treat hovers behind the characters of “The World’s End”. The tagline of the showing, “three flavourful movies in one night,” is printed at the bottom.]
Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and The World’s End: although there are no recurring characters or plot elements, these three films are all directed by Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost are said to comprise the Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy. Each film is a genre comedy of a different style; Shaun of the Dead is a zombie romantic comedy, Hot Fuzz is a buddy-cop movie, and The World’s End is a science-fiction movie about an alien invasion.

Although each movie in the Cornetto Trilogy is very different plot-wise, there are some thematic elements that span all movies, like the bromance between the characters played by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Especially in Hot Fuzz does the line between bromance and romance become blurred, as was even acknowledged by the movie’s creators and actors in a memorable Twitter session in 2009 where many recommendations of slash fiction and some steamy prompts were shared by the movie’s cast and crew.

 Celebrate the Cornetto Trilogy fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 and expanding the Fanlore page by adding fan resources and fandom stories. Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection!  

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[A poster for a special marathon showing of the three films comprising the Cornetto Trilogy hosted by AMC Theaters in August 2013. The poster features the text “Edgar Wright’s The Cornetto Trilogy” above the three Cornetto flavors: to the left, the Strawberry Cornetto is shown above the cast from “Shaun of the Dead”; to the right, the Original Cornetto sits above the characters and logo of “Hot Fuzz”; in the center, the Mint Chocolate Chip-flavored treat hovers behind the characters of “The World’s End”. The tagline of the showing, “three flavourful movies in one night,” is printed at the bottom.]


Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and The World’s End: although there are no recurring characters or plot elements, these three films are all directed by Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost are said to comprise the Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy. Each film is a genre comedy of a different style; Shaun of the Dead is a zombie romantic comedy, Hot Fuzz is a buddy-cop movie, and The World’s End is a science-fiction movie about an alien invasion.

Although each movie in the Cornetto Trilogy is very different plot-wise, there are some thematic elements that span all movies, like the bromance between the characters played by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. Especially in Hot Fuzz does the line between bromance and romance become blurred, as was even acknowledged by the movie’s creators and actors in a memorable Twitter session in 2009 where many recommendations of slash fiction and some steamy prompts were shared by the movie’s cast and crew.

Celebrate the Cornetto Trilogy fandom by posting your fanworks to AO3 and expanding the Fanlore page by adding fan resources and fandom stories. Don’t forget you can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection!


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess game. Link stands at an angle in the foreground, dressed in green with his sword strapped to his back.  A shadowed figure can be seen over his shoulder where the image fades to black.]
In 1986 The Legend of Zelda was released in Japan for the Famicon Disk System.  It was released in the United States and Europe in 1987 and later converted for the Nintendo Entertainment System.  Today, the Legend of Zelda series is one of Nintendo’s longest-running and most popular video game series.  The games typically center on three characters: the protagonist, Link, Princess Zelda, and the evil Ganondorf.  Despite differences in story or setting, each game in the series is made to feel similar through the use of secondary characters, places or items presented in other games. The mystical artifact known as the Triforce also features heavily in the series, as an item that Link is often tasked to protect, or retrieve.

In the nearly thirty years since The Legend of Zelda was created by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka for Nintendo, the series has become home to 17 official games, several spin-off games, an American animated series, and several manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo. The series received it’s biggest bump in popularity in 1998 with the release of Ocarina of Time. The first websites for the fandom went up during this time, when the internet as we know it was still new.  Many of those sites are still online for fans to enjoy.

Help celebrate The Lengend of Zelda fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.   

(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April.  Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)

[An image for The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess game. Link stands at an angle in the foreground, dressed in green with his sword strapped to his back. A shadowed figure can be seen over his shoulder where the image fades to black.]


In 1986 The Legend of Zelda was released in Japan for the Famicon Disk System. It was released in the United States and Europe in 1987 and later converted for the Nintendo Entertainment System. Today, the Legend of Zelda series is one of Nintendo’s longest-running and most popular video game series. The games typically center on three characters: the protagonist, Link, Princess Zelda, and the evil Ganondorf. Despite differences in story or setting, each game in the series is made to feel similar through the use of secondary characters, places or items presented in other games. The mystical artifact known as the Triforce also features heavily in the series, as an item that Link is often tasked to protect, or retrieve.

In the nearly thirty years since The Legend of Zelda was created by Shigeru Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka for Nintendo, the series has become home to 17 official games, several spin-off games, an American animated series, and several manga adaptations commissioned by Nintendo. The series received it’s biggest bump in popularity in 1998 with the release of Ocarina of Time. The first websites for the fandom went up during this time, when the internet as we know it was still new. Many of those sites are still online for fans to enjoy.

Help celebrate The Lengend of Zelda fandom this month by posting all fanworks old and new at AO3, and sharing your fandom stories on the Fanlore page! You can also share your works and recs with other fans in our April Showers collection.


(In honor of our April Showers festivities, we’re highlighting one fandom for each day in April. Help us celebrate by keeping an eye on our social media sites: AO3 Twitter, AO3 Tumblr, and Fanlore Twitter.)